The Smallest Of Things Can Raise The Bar In Customer Service

raiseLate last week, we received an email to support pointing out that we had a typo on our website and the ticket made its way to me.  One of our pages said something like “300,000,000 million” which at best is “300 million” but the way it is written is actually “300 million million.”  At the time I thanked the customer and told him we would get it fixed and I would let him know when it was fixed.

Fortunately typos are really easy to fix, especially when the guy that develops the website is extremely quick and responsive.  We got it fixed today and I wrote the customer the following:

I just want to thank you again for pointing out this poor grammar on our website. This has been updated. Have a terrific day!

He wrote me back saying:

You are quite welcome. I was checking out the website and noticed it and just thought I’d give you a heads up.  I have never gotten such a great response from any customer service, I am very impressed. 

He went on to indicate that he isn’t our customer yet and was just looking at our site.  I am thrilled that my little response left that kind of impression on a potential customer!

I learned two lessons from this exchange.  Lesson number one is to Follow Up!  Even if the issue is seemingly small and insignificant, it is NOT insignificant because it came from a customer.

Lesson number 2 is if my response qualifies as a great response then the customer service bar for this customer is set very low.  I’m reminded that another way to state the purpose of our blog is to say we are raising the bar in customer service.  Start today with something small, like choosing to see the importance in the smallest of requests from a customer, and let’s raise the bar in customer service together!

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Jeremy Watkin is the Director of Customer Experience at FCR, the premiere provider of outsourced call center and business process solutions. He has more than 17 years of experience as a customer service and experience professional. He is co-founder of the Customer Service Life blog and a regular contributor. Jeremy has been recognized many times for his thought leadership. Follow him on Twitter and LinkedIn for more awesome customer service and experience insights.

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